RESOURCE GUIDE
ON HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS
WASTE MANAGEMENT
July 1996

 

 

 

 

Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet
Division of Waste Management
Local Planning and Assistance Section
14 Reilly Road
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 564-6716

 

Introduction

The purpose of the Resource Guide on Household Hazardous Waste Management is to provide guidance and information concerning proper waste management practices for household products that contain hazardous chemicals.

The Resource Guide on Household Hazardous Waste Management consists of the following seven sections:

Section 1- provides an overview of potential problems created by improper disposal and introduces proper management and disposal techniques.

Section 2- shows how to be a wise consumer by decreasing the amount of household hazardous waste products purchased.

Section 3- shows how to reduce the use of household hazardous products by relying on alternative non-hazardous product substitutes. This section also outlines proper handling and disposal methods.

Section 4- is a quick and easy reference guide for a variety of household hazardous products, including proper disposal and less toxic alternatives.

Section 5- consists of suggested safety guidelines and procedures for purchasing, using, storing and disposing of household products containing hazardous chemicals.

Section 6- offers suggestions for public education programs about household hazardous waste management.

Section 7- lists resources used in compiling this guide book.

 

Understanding Household Hazardous Waste

Many household products contain chemicals that when discarded contribute to the contamination of natural resources including water supplies. It has been estimated that in an average city of 100,000 residents, 3.75 tons of toilet bowl cleaner, 13.75 tons of liquid household cleaners and 3.44 tons of used motor oil are discharged into city drains each month. And those figures do not reflect the large quantities of household hazardous waste "disposed" in backyards or in septic tanks.

Nearly all households generate hazardous wastes. Everyday personal care products like nail polish and remover, spot removers, moth balls, shoe polish and even some medicines produce potentially hazardous wastes when they are thrown out. Other examples include pest strips, pesticides, drain and oven cleaners, furniture polish and wax, paints, stains, wood preservatives, used motor oil and antifreeze.

Generally, a substance is considered hazardous if it can catch fire, react or explode when mixed with other substances, or is corrosive or toxic. This terminology on hazardous substances is more specifically defined as follows:

To protect groundwater resources, the state enacted stringent design standards for all contained landfills operating after July 1, 1995. Designs include impermeable clay liners, leachate collection systems and groundwater monitoring systems. Since all operating landfills meet these stringent standards, household hazardous waste can be disposed with other household garbage. However, household hazardous waste products should be recycled or composted whenever possible.

This guide outlines several opportunities for households to prevent environmental and public health problems due to improper disposal of household hazardous products. Proper household hazardous waste management practices include: using non-hazardous alternative products; purchasing limited quantities of products containing hazardous substances; participating in waste exchange programs; recycling and composting; and preparing household hazardous waste products for landfilling.

 

Consumer Information

Being a wise consumer can decrease the amount of household hazardous waste you must deal with. Below are some suggestions to assist you:

 

Read The Label Before Using

When consumers purchase household products, such as corrosive toilet cleaners and ignitable paint thinners, they may not think about the hazardous substances contained in these products or their pollution potential when improperly managed or disposed. Therefore, consumers are encouraged to read product labels and purchase household products with less or non-hazardous ingredients or use safer substitutes.

In the "old days" people had to deal with many of the same types of dirt, grease and stains found today. They would clean things with products found around the home, which were usually much less toxic than those used today. A basic difference between the cleaners of yesterday and those of today is a little "elbow grease." Safer substitutes may require more energy from the user, but using alternative home cleaners, disinfectants and polishes can drastically reduce the amount of hazardous products used in the home. Substitutes can also save money. For example, instead of buying air fresheners, open windows when possible to air things out. Use baking soda in odor-producing areas. Recipes using vinegar, bleach or baking soda serve to clean many things around the home. Local county extension agents should be contacted for the publication Hazardous Household Substances: Alternatives That Are Relatively Free of Toxic Effects. This publication contains various recipes for cleaners that can be made from relatively toxic-free products.

When purchasing household products that contain hazardous substances, carefully consider how to use the products safely. Purchase only the amount needed for the task. When unused portions remain, consider recycling or reusing them when possible, and disposing in a way that will not pose a risk to you, your home or farmstead, or the environment. A few simple management principles apply in every situation:

The remainder of this section provides information about the proper handling and disposal of household hazardous waste products found in most homes.

Maintenance Products
Maintenance products include solvent-based strippers, thinners, mineral spirits, cleaners, wood polishes/cleaners, paints and stains, products used on cars, tractors and other vehicles or equipment and wood preservatives. The best way to manage these products is to use them for their intended purpose.

Unused household hazardous waste products can be disposed in contained landfills. However, Kentucky law prohibits the disposal of liquids in landfills to prevent the free liquids from leaching into the groundwater. When disposing of household hazardous waste products at contained landfills, follow these recommendations:

The following recommendations for the disposal of vehicle maintenance products should be used:

Wood Preservatives
Wood preservatives may be or contain pesticides. Unused portions should be treated with extreme care. Again, try to use all products purchased for the intended purpose, or give the unused product to someone who will use it for its intended purpose. If not, contact the store where the product was purchased to see if the retailer or the manufacturer will accept the remainder. If leftovers must be disposed, mix with kitty litter and send to a contained landfill.

Pesticides
This category of potentially hazardous substances includes all types of pesticides and their containers, including those used for indoor plants and yard care.

All categories of pesticides should be handled as directed on the label to prevent health and environmental problems. Pay particular attention to pesticides classified as "restricted use." Pesticide labels and regulations describe the proper and legal use of regulated compounds. Older pesticides might not have current warning labels, and some may have even been banned since the time of purchase.

The only acceptable disposal practice for unused or unwanted (not banned) pesticides is to use the product according to current label directions. If a person has no further use for a pesticide, it should be given to someone who will use it accordingly. If that is not an option, the retailer where the pesticide was purchased should be contacted to see if he or the manufacturer will accept it.

When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cancels the registration of a pesticide, i.e., the pesticide is banned, it may provide a "buy-back" and disposal program for a period of time. The Kentucky Division of Pesticides, phone: (502)564-7274, should be contacted for more information on buy-back and disposal programs. If no program is available, the retailer where the pesticide was purchased should be contacted to see if he or the manufacturer will accept it. If that is not an option, properly store the pesticide until a buy-back or other banned pesticide collection service becomes available. The best way to avoid these problems is to purchase only the amount of pesticide needed for one growing season.

Pesticide waste includes empty containers as well as unused product. Pesticides come in minibulk tanks, plastic, metal, glass and paper containers. Minibulk tanks are returned to the place of purchase when application is completed. Some five-gallon plastic containers can be returned to the place of purchase for disposal.

Plastic pesticide containers should be immediately triple or pressure rinsed, punctured and recycled at a "rinse and return" program. If no "rinse and return" program is offered in the county, the retailer should be contacted to see if he accepts empty containers. Also, the county extension agent should be contacted to find out if a "rinse and return" program is scheduled for the future in or near the county. If no program is available, the triple or pressure rinsed, punctured containers should be disposed of in a contained landfill or transfer station.

 

Quick and Easy Reference Guide

Automotive Products

Auto
Products

Hazardous
Ingredients

Hazard
Properties

Proper
Disposal

Less Toxic
Alternatives

Antifreeze

* Ethylene glycol Toxic Recycle antifreeze waste at service station, reclamation center or Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) collection station. Waste can be disposed of at some wastewater treatment plants where bacteria can detoxify the material. (Call your local treatment plant.) Do not pour on the ground or in a septic tank. Propylene glycol may be less toxic

Recycled antifreeze

Batteries

Sulfuric acid

Lead

Corrosive
Toxic
Recycle used batteries through a service station, reclamation center or HHW collection station or return to store where purchased for disposal. Unknown

Brake Fluids

Glycol ethers

Heavy metals

Flammable
Toxic
Recycle brake fluid waste through a service station, reclamation center or HHW collection station. Unknown

Transmission Fluids

Hydrocarbons

Mineral oils

Flammable
Toxic
Recycle transmission fluid waste through a service station, reclamation center or HHW collection station. Recycled transmission fluids (toxic, yet recycled)

Used Oils

Hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene)

Heavy metals

Flammable
Toxic
Recycle used motor oil through a service station, reclamation center or HHW collection station. Unknown

 

Household Products

Household
Products

Hazardous
Ingredients

Hazard
Properties

Proper
Disposal

Less Toxic
Alternatives

Abrasive Cleaners and Powders

Trisodiumphosphate

Ammonia

Ethanol

Corrosive
Toxic
Irritant
* Use all abrasive cleaner or powdered products so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the abrasive cleaner or powder container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* In rare circumstances when abrasive cleaners or powder products will not be completely used, the waste should be stored following these guidelines:

  • Keep substances in the original container, unless the container is leaking. In this case, enclose the product in another container that is properly labeled.
  • Keep a list of stored hazardous products in your home (include name and date purchased.)
  • Be sure label is securely affixed to the container.
  • Store in a cool, dry area.
  • Keep substances out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Keep incompatible chemical products stored separately.
  • Periodically check containers for deterioration.
Rub area with 1/2 lemon dipped in borax, rinse and dry

Baking soda

Borax

Ammonia-based Cleaners

Ammonia

Ethanol

Corrosive
Toxic
Irritant
* Use all ammonia-based cleaners so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the ammonia-based cleaner container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* In rare circumstances when ammonia-based cleaners will not be completely used, the waste should be stored following the guidelines listed under Abrasive Cleaners and Powders.

Undiluted white vinegar in a spray bottle

Bleach Cleaners

Sodium or potassium hydroxide

Hydrogen peroxide

Sodium or calcium hypochlorite

Corrosive
Toxic
* Use all bleach cleaners so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the bleach cleaner container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* In rare circumstances when bleach cleaners will not be completely used, the waste should be stored following the guidelines listed under Abrasive Cleaners and Powders.

Laundry: 1/2 cup vinegar, baking soda, or borax per load.

Disinfectants

Diethylene

Methylene glycol

Sodium hypochlorite

Phenols

Corrosive
Toxic
* Use all disinfectants so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the disinfectant container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* In rare circumstances when disinfectants will not be completely used, the waste should be stored following the guidelines listed under Abrasive Cleaners and Powders.

Mix 1/2 cup borax with 1 gallon of boiling water

Undiluted white vinegar

Drain Cleaners

Sodium or potassium hydroxide

Sodium hypochlorite

Hydrochloric acid

Petroleum distillates

Corrosive
Toxic
* Drain cleaner wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty drain cleaner containers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the label.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the drain cleaner container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Use a plunger

Flush weekly with boiling water

Pour in 1/4 cup baking soda

Floor & Furniture Polish

Diethylene Glycol

Petroleum distillates

Nitrobenzene

Flammable
Toxic
* Floor and furniture polish wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty floor & furniture polish containers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the label.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the floor & furniture polish container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

1 part lemon juice & 2 parts linseed oil

Toothpaste to remove water stains

Household Batteries

Mercury

Silver

Cadmium

Lithium

Zinc

Toxic * Recycle used household batteries through a service station, reclamation center or household hazardous waste collection station. Solar- powered batteries

Wind-up watches

Recharge- ables

AC adapters

Mothballs

Naphthalenes

Paradichloro-
benzene

Toxic * Use all mothballs so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the mothball container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* Mothball wastes can be disposed of at some wastewater treatment plants where bacteria can detoxify the chemical. (Call your local treatment plant.) Do not pour used mothballs on the ground or into a septic tank.

Store cedar chips

Newspapers

Lavender flowers with clothing

Oven Cleaners

Potassium or sodium hydroxide

Ammonia

Corrosive
Toxic
* Use all oven cleaners so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the oven cleaner container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* In rare circumstances when oven cleaners will not be completely used, the waste should be stored following the guidelines listed under Abrasive Cleaners & Powders.

Wipe oven while still warm

Use baking soda/water paste and steel wool to scrub

Photographic Chemicals

Silver

Sodium sulfite

Acetic acid

Hydroquinone

Corrosive
Toxic
Irritant
* Photographic chemicals should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program

is organized.

* Empty photographic chemical containers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the photographic chemical container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Unknown

Pool Chemicals

Muriatic acid

Sodium hypochlorite

Algicide

Corrosive * Pool chemicals should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste program is organized.

* Empty pool chemical containers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the pool chemical container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Disinfectants: ozone or UV light system

pH: consult baking soda box for amount to add for proper pH

Rug & Upholstery Cleaners

Napthalene

Perchlorethylene

Oxalic acid

Diethylene glycol

Corrosive
Toxic
* Rug & upholstery cleaners should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program

is organized.

* Empty rug & upholstery cleaner containers may be triple- rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the rug & upholstery container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Clean immediately with soda water or baking soda paste, then vacuum

Toilet Cleaners

Muriatic (hydrochloric) or oxalic acid

Paradichloro-
benzene

Calcium hypochlorite

Corrosive
Toxic
Irritant
* Toilet cleaners should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Use all toilet cleaners so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the toilet cleaner

container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* In rare circumstances, when toilet cleaners will not be completely used, this waste should be stored following the guidelines listed under Abrasive Cleaners & Powders.

Toilet brush and baking soda

Borax or soak with white vinegar

 

Paint Products

Paint
Products

Hazardous
Ingredients

Hazard
Properties

Proper
Disposal

Less Toxic
Alternatives

Enamel or Oil- Based Paints

Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons

Mineral spirits

Some pigments

Flammable
Toxic
* Enamel and oil-based paint wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Partially used enamel or oil-based paints may be exchanged with friends and neighbors or can be donated to community groups like Habitat for Humanity.

* Empty enamel or oil-based paint containers may be triple- rinsed according to the instructions on the label.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the enamel or oil- based paint container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Latex

Water- based paint

Paint and Varnish Remover

Acetone

Ketones

Alcohol

Xylene

Toluene

Methylene chloride

Flammable
Toxic
* Paints and varnish remover wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Partially used paints and varnish removers may be exchanged with friends and neighbors or can be donated to community groups like Habitat for Humanity.

* Empty paint and varnish remover containers may be triple- rinsed according to the instructions on the label.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the paint and varnish remover container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Sandpaper, scraper and heat gun

Latex or Water-Based Paints

Ethylene glycol

Resins

Glycol ethers

Phenyl mercuric acetate

Some pigments

Toxic * Use all latex or water-based paints so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Partially used latex or water based paints may be exchanged with friends and neighbors or can be donated to community groups like Habitat for Humanity.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the latex or water-based paint container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Latex without these named ingredients

Limestone- based (white- wash) paint

Rust Proofing Coatings

Methylene chloride

Toluene

Petroleum distillates

Xylene

Some pigments

Flammable
Toxic
* Rust proofing coating wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Partially used rust proofing coating may be exchanged with friends or neighbors or can be donated to community groups like Habitat for Humanity.

* Empty rust proofing coating containers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the rust proofing coating container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Unknown

Stains and Varnishes

Mineral spirits

Glycol ethers

Ketones

Xylene

Toluene

Flammable
Toxic
* Stains and varnishes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Partially used stains and varnishes may be exchanged with friends or neighbors or can be donated to community groups like Habitat for Humanity.

* Empty stain and varnish containers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the stain and varnish container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Latex or water- based finishes

Thinners and Turpentine

Alcohol

Ketones

Acetone

Turpentine

Esters

Petroleum distillates

Flammable
Toxic
* Keep contained in a tightly closed jar to allow contaminants to settle out. Strain paint thinner and turpentine through a fine mesh sieve; reuse the liquid. The concentrated contaminant should be stored and taken to a household hazardous waste collection station. Use water in water- based paints

 

Pesticides

Pesticides

Hazardous
Ingredients

Hazard
Properties

Proper
Disposal

Less Toxic
Alternatives

Arsenicals

Lead arsenate

Calcium arsenate

Monosodium methane arsenate (MSMA)

Paris green

Toxic * Arsenical wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty pesticide containers of arsenicals may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the arsenical pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

For ants: avoid ant stakes; use insecticidal boric acid where ants enter.

(Toxic to children and pets.)

Botanicals

Pyrethrins

Rotenone

Nicotine

Toxic * Botanical wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty pesticide containers of botanicals may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the label.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the botanical pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Insecticidal soap

Import predators (ladybugs, ground beetles and preying mantis).

Carbamates

Carbaryl

Aldicarb

Carbofuran (restricted-use pesticide)

Propoxur

Toxic * Carbamate wastes should be safely stored or used on target area only until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty pesticide containers of carbamates may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the carbamate pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Keep garden weed-free

Import predators

Insecticidal soap

Chlorinated Hydrocarbons

Aldrin

Endrin

Heptachlor

Dicofol

Chlordane

Lindane

Kepone **

Dieldrin **

DDT **

(**- pesticides discontinued over 10 years ago or more)

Toxic * Chlorinated hydrocarbon waste should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty pesticide containers of chlorinated hydrocarbons, however, may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Keep garden free of debris

Import predators

Use insecticidal soap

Flea Collars and Sprays

Carbamates

Pyrethrins

Organo-phosphates

Toxic * Use all flea collar and spray products so that no waste remains except residuals attached to the container. Containers should be rinsed with water. The rinse water may be either reused or poured down the drain with great quantities of water.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the flea collar and spray pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

* In rare circumstances when flea collar and spray products will not be completely used, the waste should be stored following the guidelines listed under Abrasive Cleaners and Powders.

Herbal collar/ointment (eucalyptus or rosemary)

Brewer’s yeast (call vet for correct amount)

Fungicides

Captan

Fopet

Anilazine

Copper/Zinc compounds

Toxic * Fungicide wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty containers of fungicides may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the fungicide pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Do not over water

Aerate soil

Keep areas dethatched and dry

Herbicides

2, 4-D

Glyphosate

Prometon

Toxic * Herbicide wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty containers of herbicides may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the herbicide pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Hand weeding

Let grass grow 2-3 inches to shade weed seedlings

Houseplant Insecticide

Methoprene

Malathion

Tetramethrin

Carbaryl

Toxic * Houseplant insecticide wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty containers of houseplant insecticides may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the household insecticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Mix 2 pounds of dishwashing liquid with 2 cups of water and spray on leaves

Mouse and Rat Poisons

Brodifacoum

Coumarins (e.g., warfarin)

Strychnine

Toxic * Mouse and rat poison product wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty containers of mouse and rat poisons may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the mouse and rat poison pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Live traps

Caulk and seal all holes

Ultrasonic wave- emitting devices

Organo-
phosphates

Parathion

Malathion

Diazinon - R

Dichlorvos (DDVP)

Chlorpyifos

Toxic * Organo-phosphate wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program

is organized.

* Empty containers of organo-phosphates may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the organo- phosphate pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Remove plant debris or wood from garden

Use insecticidal soap

Roach and Ant Killers

Organo-phosphates

Carbamates

Pyrethrins

Toxic * Roach and ant killers should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Empty containers of roach and ant killers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the roach and ant killer pesticide container is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Place boric acid in and along cracks (Toxic to children and pets.)

Wood Preservatives

Copper or zinc naphthenate

Creosote

Magnesium flourosilicate

Petroleum distillates

Chlorinated phenols (e.g., PCP)

Flammable
Toxic
* Wood preservative wastes should be safely stored until a community household hazardous waste collection program is organized.

* Partially used wood preservatives may be exchanged with friends or neighbors or can be donated to community groups like Habitat for Humanity.

* Empty wood preservative containers may be triple-rinsed according to the instructions on the labels.

* Because of strict landfill standards, once the wood preservatives is rinsed, it can be discarded with other residential waste.

Water- based wood preservatives

 

Safety Guidelines and Procedures

1. Rules of Thumb for Reducing Exposure to Toxins
Recognizing that most individuals will continue to use some home and garden products containing toxic chemicals, the following suggestions are provided to limit exposure and reduce the potential for accidents.

2. Use Safer Substitutes

3. Environmentally Safe Stain Removal

 

Keep Information Available to the Public

Many communities work with the county extension service to produce brochures and conduct workshops and presentations on proper management of household hazardous wastes. The brochures are distributed to the general public through school programs, community education programs, recycling centers and through retail outlets such as farm businesses.

Use of the local media can reach the largest audience. An environmental column in the newspaper is an excellent place to educate the public on household hazardous waste management. Public service announcements through local radio and cable channels are also effective.

The information provided should be easy to read and understand. Examples of alternative products should be given whenever possible. A telephone number should be published for assistance in proper methods for handling and disposing of household hazardous waste.

Public education programs about household hazardous waste management should deal with the following topics:

 

Resources

The Household Hazardous Waste Management Guide was developed by compiling sections of the following documents on household hazardous waste management: